Plantar Fasciitis and Me

Imagine a translucent marble stuck between you and the floor. It’s settled within your left heel and it goes everywhere you go. Most times it rolls into the inner aspect of your heel, other times it plays in the middle, and then just for fun it will toy with the outer rim for a bit.

You’re never quite sure where it will be, or if it will be. In the mornings, you sit up in bed and study the benign tile floor. The floor that used to feel so cool and smooth beneath your naked feet. Can I chance it, you think. Can I, should I, try walking the six steps to the bathroom without my shoes? It’s such an innocent request, to indulge a penchant for walking barefoot in the house.

You swing your legs over and gingerly place your feet on the floor. You stand, and oh, there it is. The marble says hello, and your shoes are in the closet, so you hobble on to the bathroom, careening and holding on to the wall, the vanity, the doorjamb of the bathroom door. To anyone looking, you would appear to be really old, or really drunk.

Once done with your morning ablution, you sway into the walk-in closet to retrieve your shoes. Ouch, ouch, ouch. Every step is a penance but what you are paying for you do not know.

You slip your feet into the warm embrace of your shoes and find that your prayers have been heard. You can walk upright and steady again. For the moment, the marble is neutralized.

(Some info on this condition and on foot pain with RA)

crocsI don’t mean to sound like an advertisement but, truly, these Crocs are the only shoes I can walk in for long periods. They have a cushioned sole akin to a shock absorber, an arch support, a heel cup that cradles and protects, and beading that massages my feet. The straps are elastic so they can never bind. And best of all, they are light, practically weightless, unlike me.

I currently own four pairs, two pairs stockpiled for later, because I don’t know how long this condition might last and I don’t want to run the risk of not being able to replace them. I use one pair for home, and one for running errands. They look great with my jeans, but even if they didn’t, I wouldn’t care.

It’s been several months now, and from my reading I find that I can be careening and swaying for up to one year. During my NYC trip last month, I had to take one day off to rest my foot. The pain was exquisitely excruciating, or excruciatingly exquisite, but definitely well worth it.

In two weeks, I will be on the road again, hopefully in time to welcome  a new grandbaby, and to reconnect with my lovely Carmen. There won’t be many opportunities to sit still with my feet up, but again, so very, very worth it.

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8 thoughts on “Plantar Fasciitis and Me

  1. Wren

    Oh, Irma, that sounds so painful! I’m glad you have those Crocs! Snobs laugh at them (I don’t get why–maybe someone can enlighten me), but like you, I have several pairs of their sandals. My feet hurt badly from RD so often, and sometimes they’re the only shoes I can walk in. The fact that they look great doesn’t hurt, either. I also have a pair of the old, traditional, ugly Crocs–and I can wear them when I hurt better than any of my other shoes. It’s the cushioning and the arch support–Crocs actually have arch supports, unlike other brands of shoes these days–that seems to make the difference for me.

    I do hope that plantar fascitus eases up sooner rather than later for you. Do you use any other supports or splints for it? Sending a warm hug and best wishes your way. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Irma Post author

      Hi, Wren. You know it comes and goes, though I have to say it mostly comes these days. Crocs are the best, second only to Clarks. I don’t use any splints. Besides a few NSAID doses here and there, I roll a frozen water bottle under my heel while I’m at my desk. It makes it feel better, or maybe it just numbs it so I don’t feel the hurt to much. Whatever, it works!

      Reply
  2. J.G. Chayko

    I have never had plantar facciitis and by the sounds of it, hope I never do. I have however had foot pain which I have associated with years of dance (particularly ballet) and have trouble with locking toes (which has its own unique pain). In my first few years with RA, I didn’t have much pain in my feet, but that changed this year and now, I too look for those comfortable shoes. I hope the pain eases before your trip and hopefully it will get lost in the joy of your visit. Stay well X

    Reply
    1. Irma Post author

      I’ve never heard of locking toes, sounds painful. I can imagine after years of dance your feet would give you trouble eventually. I expected as much after years of running around on cold, hospital floors, so I’m not too surprised, though I wish it had waited to show up a bit longer. But my comfort shoes will definitely be along for the ride when I go to welcome the new baby!

      Reply
  3. Carla Kienast

    Hi Irma: So sorry to hear you’re suffering with this (on top of everything else!). But how wonderful to know that you’re traveling AND there’s a new baby in the future. What a blessed holiday present! I love my Crocs. I first started wearing mine when I saw Chef Mario Batalli in his signature orange crocs. I figured if they helped an overweight chef stay on his feet all day, they’re worth checking out. I always wear mine when I’m going to be on my feet for a while (in the kitchen cooking!). What a world of difference it makes. It always warms my heart when I see a new post from you. Enjoy your travels. Hopefully that “marble” will roll away somewhere else very soon.

    Reply
    1. Irma Post author

      Hi, Carla. Hope you are enjoying your retirement! It’s like opening the door to so many possibilities in life. I do like my Crocs. A lot of the nurses and doctors wore them. They are a lifesaver. Back then, though, I stuck to my SAS shoes, I wore sassy black. But I have come around to liking these Crocs.

      Reply
  4. Kim

    Nurses love crocs 🙂 I don’t have problems with my feet, other than some occasional swelling and pain, but nothing like what you described. Glad you have a shoe that helps you deal with the symptoms so the the symptoms don’t sideline you. Grandbaby?? ENJOY! 🙂

    Reply
  5. phat50chick

    Congrats that you have a new baby on the way. So exciting. Never had PF, but everyone I know that has says it is excrutiating. Wishing you pain free feet for your visit grandma!

    Reply

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